Doodle Science - March 2015



Circulated to schools, organisations and individuals - covering primary science and related bits and bobs.



Minature dafodils



Spring is coming and this is my first daffodil of the season. It is a miniature one that does not get over 30 cms tall. Bought last year because they were going "reduced to sell fresh" and it seemed a shame. sadly I am not sure which one of the thousands of cultivars it is, possible one called Tete a tete which for no other reason is interesting as it has an extra set of chromosomes. And yes, there is some slug damage too, but they wake up early.

Great Dates in Sci and Tech for March


1st 1966 ~ Venera 3 space probe landed but did not send back the first pictures of the surface of the planet Venus

4th 1493 ~ Columbus get back to Europe having discovered the New World

4th 1887 ~ Daimler unveils his first 4 wheel internal combustion car

7th 1799 ~ The Royal Institution was founded by the very interesting Count Rumford, a man with a strange history

8th 1934 ~ Edwin Hubble produces a photo with showing there are more galaxies than stars in the Milky Way.

13th 1781 ~ Herschel discovers a planet in his back garden. He used a telescope and it was Uranus.

18th 1965 ~ Leonov becomes the first person to space walk.

22nd 1895 ~ First screening of moving pictures by the Lumiere Brothers.

30th 1842 ~ Dr Longs first use of anaethesia in an operation

30th 1858 ~ First pencil with a rubber attached.

20th of March. Solar Eclipse (partial for most of us)


Pinhole projector The Pinhole Projection Method One safe way of enjoying the Sun during a partial eclipse--or anytime--is a "pinhole camera," which allows you to view a projected image of the Sun. There are fancy pinhole cameras you can make out of cardboard boxes, but a perfectly adequate (and portable) version can be made out of two thin but stiff pieces of white cardboard. Punch a small clean pinhole in one piece of cardboard and let the sunlight fall through that hole onto the second piece of cardboard, which serves as a screen, held below it. An inverted image of the Sun is formed. To make the image larger, move the screen farther from the pinhole. To make the image brighter, move the screen closer to the pinhole. Do not make the pinhole wide or you will only have a shaft of sunlight rather than an image of the crescent Sun. Remember, this instrument is used with your back to the Sun. The sunlight passes over your shoulder, through the pinhole, and forms an image on the cardboard screen beneath it. Do not look through the pinhole at the Sun.

From http://www.mreclipse.com/ Don't look at the Sun through anything.

Wordmap of everything. Type in a word and see what happens.

a very impressive rolling Robot

If you have not had a look, School Science might be useful